Should people eat less meat? | Meat


Should people eat less meat?

The movement away from excessive meat-eating is too slow, we must legislate.

By Huw Morgan


There are an overwhelming number of reasons not to eat meat, so much so that to ignore them is cognitive dissonance at its most formidable. When I ask anyone I know if they think they should eat less meat they invariably say yes, so why aren’t we, en masse, eating less meat?

I would suggest that for every person there is at least one reason which could stick in their mind and encourage a reduction in their consumption: the mass slaughter (70 million poultry birds per month) of sentient creatures, 20 servings of vegetables having less greenhouse gas emissions than one serving of beef, the many studies linking (particularly red) meat with ill health, or the extra expense of eating meat twice a day. Take your pick.

Even if we hit every single other carbon target to keep warming under 1.5C, it will not happen unless we reduce emissions from the agricultural industry. ie. we must eat less meat, or else we’ll all die, hyperbole intentional.

As a non-meat eater I understand the adjustments that one has to make. Vegetarianism, whilst on the rise, is still seen as different, it still elicits the question of “oh, how come?” rather than just being a thing which people do. Like many problems which need mass behavioural shift, it is time to nudge the consumer, to use a marketing phrase. Eating meals without meat needs to be the easier choice.

Most high street restaurants have 2 or 3 veggie options at best (often generic), supermarkets have enormous meat isles, gleaming under their fluorescent lights like living diamonds, cooking programs rarely feature meat-free meals, schools go the same way as restaurants. As a human species we are embarrassingly narrow-minded.

There are over 50,000 species of edible plants in the world, yet 3 (wheat, maize, rice) make up 60% of what we fuel ourselves with. It is a symptom of why people associate vegetarianism (and veganism, it’s more radical cousin) with the giving up of choice, the loss of decision, but I would argue so strongly that a diet without meat is infinitely more exciting. The oft-maligned extra expense of “eating healthily” is a myth. Chickpeas, barley, lentils, sweet potatoes, carrots, kale, spinach, rice, not to mention other myriad of pulses and grains are all inexpensive. The list of cheap and versatile ingredients which you are forced to take in when removing meat from your cooking reads like an Oscar nominee list of amazing, healthy foods.

So what is to be done? Projects like taking meat off the menu at schools once a week, Meat-free Mondays doing something similar involving restaurants lead the way. Consumers are a fickle bunch, and will adapt. The 5p bag tax caused precisely zero outrage and the smoking ban did not end the world as we knew it.

Legislation and national schemes work, and people quickly find a new normal. When people cry foul at the “taking away of choice” it is totally disingenuous. The free market has no way of appropriately pricing the meat it sells, I may cry foul that your meat consumption is causing emissions which are damaging my lungs. I won’t, because the time for shaming, I believe, has gone. If the externalities of meat-eating were internalised, it would be much more expensive and people would probably buy less of it.

The agricultural industry is a fierce beast and we must make a new society away from what has been only a recent tradition of meat twice a day. Just think, for a moment, quite how ridiculous it is that we feed our children cow’s milk. This, a substance designed to fatten a small calf in a full adult in as fast a time as possible!! Let alone the fact that this has been advocated in government policy. There is no history, no story for British people around food that doesn’t involve meat, think of fish and chips, roast dinners, pie and mash.

The shift we need is twofold: an economic/legislative and a cultural. Only then can not eating meat (or eating much, much less) cease to be odd, and take its necessary place as normal. As Michael Pollan says; eat food, not too much, mostly plants.


Photograph by TFCP Photography

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11,420 thoughts on “Should people eat less meat? | Meat

  • May 3, 2016 at 6:08 pm
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    Checkout my site about the federal republic of Nigeria

  • May 5, 2016 at 8:33 am
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    Since 2002, the North East of the nation has found sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the lay system of government and establish Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 asserted that Boko Haram strikes have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. At the same time, neighbouring countries, Benin, Chad, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in an united effort to battle Boko Haram in the consequences of a world media emphasized kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls and the spread of Boko Haram strikes to these countries.

  • May 5, 2016 at 8:39 am
    Permalink

    During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined the huge sales and OPEC generated made the economy more loaded. Despite huge earnings from oil production and sale, the military administration did little to enhance the standard of living of the population, help medium and small businesses, or invest in infrastructure. As oil earnings fuelled the rise of national subventions the government became the threshold of power and the center of political battle in the nation. The Nigerian authorities became increasingly determined by petroleum revenues and the international commodity markets for economic and budgetary concerns, as oil production and sales rose. It failed to develop other sources of the market for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism.

  • May 5, 2016 at 8:45 am
    Permalink

    An African country on the Gulf of Guinea, Nigeria, is known for wildlife reserves and its natural landmarks. Safari destinations like Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and infrequent primate habitats and Cross River National Park. Among its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national money.

  • May 5, 2016 at 8:51 am
    Permalink

    Since 2002, the North East of the nation has seen sectarian violence an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular process of government and establish Sharia law, by Boko Haram. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 asserted that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 individuals crippled. Neighbouring nations, at the exact same time, Benin, Chad, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to battle Boko Haram in the wake of a world media highlighted the spread of Boko Haram attacks and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these countries.

  • May 5, 2016 at 8:57 am
    Permalink

    Modern day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule starting in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up administrative and legal structures whilst practising indirect rule through conventional chiefdoms.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:04 am
    Permalink

    During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined the enormous earnings and OPEC created made the market more affluent. Despite enormous earnings from oil production and sale, the military administration did little help small and medium businesses, to enhance the standard of living of the population, or put money into infrastructure. As petroleum revenues fuelled the rise of federal subventions to states, the federal government became the centre of political battle and the brink of power in the nation. As oil production and revenue grew, the Nigerian authorities became increasingly dependent on petroleum sales and the international commodity markets for economical and budgetary concerns. It did not develop other sources of the market for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism in Nigeria.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:11 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria, one-third larger than Texas and the most populous country in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea in West Africa. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower path of the Niger River flows south through the western part of the state into the Gulf of Guinea. Mangrove forests and swamps border the southern coast; inland are hardwood forests.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:18 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is frequently referred to as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and market. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous nation in Africa and the seventh most populous state on the planet.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:23 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is often known as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With about 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous state in Africa and the seventh most populous country in the world.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:29 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is considered to be an emergent market by the World Bank;It has been identified as a regional power on the African continent, a central power in international affairs, and contains also been identified as an emerging global power.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:35 am
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, normally called Nigeria, is a national constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its coast in the south lies on the Gulf of Guinea in the Atlantic Ocean. It contains the Federal Capital Territory and 36 states, where Abuja, the capital is located. Nigeria is formally a laic nation that is democratic.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:42 am
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has among the largest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a multinational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with wide variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:49 am
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has one of the biggest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a transnational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups talk over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with wide assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:55 am
    Permalink

    Since 2002, the North East of the nation has found sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the lay system of government and establish Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 promised that Boko Haram strikes have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. At exactly the same time, neighbouring states, Niger, Chad, Cameroon and Benin joined Nigeria in a combined effort to fight Boko Haram in the consequences of a world media highlighted kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls and the spread of Boko Haram assaults to these states.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:02 am
    Permalink

    During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined the enormous revenue and OPEC created made the economy more affluent. Despite enormous revenues from oil production and sale, the military government did little help small and medium businesses, to improve the standard of living of the population, or put money into infrastructure. The government became the centre of political battle and the brink of power in the nation as petroleum sales fuelled the rise of federal subventions to states. As oil production and revenue climbed, the Nigerian authorities became increasingly dependent on oil sales and the international commodity markets for economical and budgetary concerns. It failed to develop other sources of the market for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:09 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is an associate of the MINT group of nations, which are broadly viewed as the earth’s next “BRIC-like” markets. It’s also recorded among the “Next Eleven” economies set to become among the biggest on earth. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the African Union, Nations, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:16 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970, and became a federation that was independent in 1960. It has since switched between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it reached a stable democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed as the first to be ran reasonably fairly and freely.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:22 am
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, typically known as Nigeria, is a national constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its shore in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea. It contains the Federal Capital Territory and 36 states, where Abuja, the capital is situated. Nigeria is formally a secular country that is democratic.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:29 am
    Permalink

    Modernday Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule starting in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through conventional chiefdoms.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:36 am
    Permalink

    During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined OPEC and the huge sales generated made the market richer. Despite huge earnings from oil production and sale, the military administration did little help medium and small businesses, to improve the standard of living of the population, or invest in infrastructure. As oil sales fuelled the rise of federal subventions to states, the government became the center of political battle and the threshold of power in the nation. The Nigerian government became increasingly determined by petroleum sales and the international commodity markets for economical and budgetary concerns as oil production and revenue climbed. It did not develop other sources of the market for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism in Nigeria.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:42 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live largely in Muslims in the northern part, and the southern part of the state. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, including those native to Yoruba and Igbo peoples.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:50 am
    Permalink

    Modern-day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule starting in the 19th century, and the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up administrative and legal structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:57 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mainly in the southern area of the country, and Muslims in the northern part. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as for instance those native to Yoruba and Igbo peoples.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:03 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mostly in the southern part of the country, and Muslims in the northern area. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, including those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:10 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mostly in Muslims in the northern area, and the southern area of the nation. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, like those native to Yoruba and Igbo peoples.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:17 am
    Permalink

    The North East of the nation has seen sectarian violence an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular system of government and create Sharia law, by Boko Haram. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 maintained that Boko Haram strikes have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 individuals crippled. At the same time, neighbouring states, Cameroon, Chad, Benin and Niger joined Nigeria in an united effort to combat Boko Haram in the aftermath of a world media highlighted kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls and the spread of Boko Haram attacks to these countries.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:24 am
    Permalink

    On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria attained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a free federation of self governing states, the independent state faced the overwhelming task of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:31 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is a part of the MINT group of nations, which are broadly seen as the world’s next “BRIC-like” economies. Additionally it is recorded among the “Next Eleven” markets set to become among the largest on the planet. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:38 am
    Permalink

    Modern day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:45 am
    Permalink

    The consequence of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. While Northern Cameroons chose to remain in Nigeria Southern Cameroon opted to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern area of the nation was now much bigger compared to the southern part. In 1963, the nation established a Federal Republic, as its first president with Azikiwe. When elections were held in 1965, the Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:51 am
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mostly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, a second military coup put Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from your north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:57 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mostly in the southern area of the state, and Muslims in the northern area. A minority of the population practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as for instance those native to Yoruba and Igbo peoples.

  • May 5, 2016 at 12:03 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria became a independent federation in 1960, and plunged into a civil war. It has since alternated between democratically-elected civilian governments and military dictatorships, until it reached a secure democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be ran moderately freely and fairly.

  • May 5, 2016 at 12:10 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is an associate of the MINT group of nations, which are widely seen as the world’s next “BRIC-like” economies. It’s also listed among the “Next Eleven” markets set to become among the biggest on the planet. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the African Union, Nations, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  • May 5, 2016 at 12:16 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria gained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) led by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition comprised the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), that was mostly dominated by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 5, 2016 at 12:23 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mostly in the southern area of the nation, and Muslims in the northern part. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, like those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  • May 5, 2016 at 12:30 pm
    Permalink

    The result of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. While Northern Cameroons chose to continue in Nigeria Southern Cameroon opted to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern part of the country was now much larger compared to the southern area. In 1963, a Federal Republic was established by the country, with Azikiwe. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria when elections were held in 1965.

  • May 5, 2016 at 12:36 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mostly in the southern part of the country, and Muslims in the northern area. A minority of the inhabitants practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, for example those native to Yoruba and Igbo peoples.

  • May 5, 2016 at 12:43 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is frequently referred to as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With about 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous nation in Africa and the seventh most populous state on the planet.

  • May 5, 2016 at 12:50 pm
    Permalink

    Since 2002, the North East of the country has seen sectarian violence an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular process of government and establish Sharia law, by Boko Haram. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 maintained that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. Neighbouring countries, at the exact same time, Benin, Chad, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to fight Boko Haram in the consequences of a world media highlighted the spread of Boko Haram attacks and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these countries.

  • May 5, 2016 at 12:56 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is thought of as an emergent marketplace by the World Bank;It continues to be identified as a regional power on the African continent, a central power in international affairs, and contains already been identified as an emerging global power.

  • May 5, 2016 at 1:03 pm
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has among the largest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a transnational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 different languages, and are identified with wide assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 5, 2016 at 1:09 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria, one-third larger than Texas and the most populous nation in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower course of the Niger River flows south through the western area of the country into the Gulf of Guinea. Swamps and mangrove forests border the southern coast; inland are hardwood forests.

  • May 5, 2016 at 1:16 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mainly in the southern part of the state, and Muslims in the northern part. A minority of the inhabitants practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as for instance those native to Yoruba and Igbo peoples.

  • May 5, 2016 at 1:22 pm
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, commonly known as Nigeria, is a national constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its shore in the south lies on the Gulf of Guinea. It comprises 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory, where the capital, Abuja is situated. Nigeria is officially a democratic laic state.

  • May 5, 2016 at 1:28 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria attained independence from the United Kingdom as a Commonwealth Realm on 1 October 1960. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) directed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition comprised the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), which was mostly dominated by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 5, 2016 at 1:35 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known for wildlife reserves and its natural landmarks. Safari destinations like Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and infrequent primate habitats and Cross River National Park. Among its most recognizable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national money.

  • May 5, 2016 at 1:41 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria became a federation that was formally independent in 1960, and plunged into a civil war. It has since alternated between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it reached a stable democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be conducted pretty freely and pretty, in 1999.

  • May 5, 2016 at 1:47 pm
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, predominantly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, a second military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, a choice unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 5, 2016 at 1:53 pm
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has one of the largest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a transnational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups talk over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with extensive variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 5, 2016 at 2:00 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria attained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) directed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition comprised the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), that has been mainly controlled by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 5, 2016 at 2:06 pm
    Permalink

    The consequence of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. While Northern Cameroons decided to continue in Nigeria Southern Cameroon picked to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern area of the country was now much larger compared to the southern area. In 1963, a Federal Republic was created by the country, as its first president with Azikiwe. When elections were held in 1965, the Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power.

  • May 5, 2016 at 2:12 pm
    Permalink

    On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria attained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a free federation of self governing states, the independent state confronted the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  • May 5, 2016 at 2:17 pm
    Permalink

    An imbalance was created in the polity by the result of the 1961 plebiscite. While Northern Cameroons chose to continue in Nigeria Southern Cameroon chosen to join the Republic of Cameroon,. The northern part of the state was now much larger as opposed to southern area. In 1963, the nation established a Federal Republic, with Azikiwe as its first president. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria when elections were held in 1965.

  • May 5, 2016 at 2:23 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria attained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) headed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition included the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), that was mainly dominated by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 5, 2016 at 2:29 pm
    Permalink

    In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first nation to effectively contain and eliminate the Ebola danger that was ravaging three other nations in the West African region, as its unique approach to contact tracing became an effective process later used by other nations, including the United States Of America, when Ebola dangers were discovered.

  • May 5, 2016 at 2:35 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is an associate of the MINT group of countries, which are widely viewed as the globe’s next “BRIC-like” markets. It is also recorded among the “Next Eleven” economies set to become among the largest in the world. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the African Union, Nations, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  • May 5, 2016 at 2:42 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970, and became a independent federation in 1960. It has since switched between democratically-elected civilian governments and military dictatorships, until it attained a secure democracy in 1999, with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed as the first to be conducted moderately pretty and freely.

  • May 5, 2016 at 2:48 pm
    Permalink

    In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first state to effectively control and remove the Ebola danger that was ravaging three other countries in the West African region, as its unique approach to contact tracing became an effective method later used by other countries, including the Usa, when Ebola risks were discovered.

  • May 5, 2016 at 2:54 pm
    Permalink

    An imbalance was created in the polity by the result of the 1961 plebiscite. While Northern Cameroons decided to continue in Nigeria Southern Cameroon preferred to join the Republic of Cameroon,. The northern area of the country was now far larger in relation to the southern area. In 1963, a Federal Republic was created by the country, with Azikiwe as its first president. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria, when elections were held in 1965.

  • May 5, 2016 at 3:00 pm
    Permalink

    Since 2002, sectarian violence has been found by the North East of the country by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the lay system of government and create Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 promised that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. At exactly the same time, neighbouring nations, Chad, Benin, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to combat Boko Haram in the wake of a world media emphasized the spread of Boko Haram assaults and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these nations.

  • May 5, 2016 at 3:07 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is a part of the MINT group of countries, which are widely viewed as the globe’s next “BRIC-like” economies. Additionally it is recorded among the “Next Eleven” markets set to become among the biggest on the planet. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the African Union, Nations, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  • May 5, 2016 at 3:13 pm
    Permalink

    An African country on the Gulf of Guinea, Nigeria, is known for wildlife reserves and its natural landmarks. Safari destinations like Cross River National Park and Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense rainforest, savanna and rare primate habitats. Among its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- .

  • May 5, 2016 at 3:19 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria, one third larger than Texas and the most populous country in Africa, is situated in West Africa on the Gulf of Guinea. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower course of the Niger River flows south through the western area of the country into the Gulf of Guinea. Swamps and mangrove forests border the southern shore; inland are hardwood forests.

  • May 5, 2016 at 3:26 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known for wildlife reserves and its natural landmarks. Safari destinations for example Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and rare primate habitats and Cross River National Park. One of its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national currency.

  • May 5, 2016 at 3:33 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria attained independence from the United Kingdom as a Commonwealth Realm on 1 October 1960. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) headed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition consisted of the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), that was largely controlled by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 5, 2016 at 3:39 pm
    Permalink

    Modern day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule starting in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through conventional chiefdoms.

  • May 5, 2016 at 3:45 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria gained independence from the United Kingdom as a Commonwealth Realm on 1 October 1960. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) directed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition comprised the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), that was largely controlled by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 5, 2016 at 3:52 pm
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mostly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, another military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an option unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the mainly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence as the Republic of Biafra on May 30, 1967. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 5, 2016 at 3:59 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is an associate of the MINT group of nations, which are widely viewed as the globe’s next “BRIC-like” markets. It is also listed among the “Next Eleven” economies set to become among the biggest on earth. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  • May 5, 2016 at 4:05 pm
    Permalink

    As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, purchasing power parity respectively and worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in relation to nominal GDP. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s biggest economy in 2014.Also, the debt-to-GDP ratio is just 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  • May 5, 2016 at 4:12 pm
    Permalink

    An imbalance was created in the polity by the result of the 1961 plebiscite. While Northern Cameroons decided to continue in Nigeria Southern Cameroon picked to join the Republic of Cameroon,. The northern part of the nation was now far bigger as opposed to southern area. In 1963, the country created a Federal Republic, with Azikiwe as its first president. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in Nigeria’s Western Region when elections were held in 1965.

  • May 5, 2016 at 4:18 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is frequently known as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and market. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous nation in Africa and the seventh most populous nation on the planet.

  • May 5, 2016 at 4:23 pm
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, commonly referred to as Nigeria, is a national constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its coast in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea. It consists of 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory, where the capital, Abuja is situated. Nigeria is formally a democratic secular country.

  • May 5, 2016 at 4:29 pm
    Permalink

    Modern-day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century, and the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  • May 5, 2016 at 4:35 pm
    Permalink

    The consequence of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. While Northern Cameroons chose to remain in Nigeria Southern Cameroon preferred to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern area of the nation was now far larger compared to the southern area. In 1963, the country established a Federal Republic, with Azikiwe as its first president. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in Nigeria’s Western Region when elections were held in 1965.

  • May 5, 2016 at 4:41 pm
    Permalink

    Modernday Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century, and the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  • May 5, 2016 at 4:48 pm
    Permalink

    The North East of the country has seen sectarian violence an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the lay process of government and establish Sharia law, by Boko Haram. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 maintained that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 individuals crippled. Neighbouring nations, at the same time, Cameroon, Chad, Benin and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to fight Boko Haram in the wake of a world media highlighted the spread of Boko Haram attacks and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these countries.

  • May 5, 2016 at 4:54 pm
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, chiefly of Ibo ethnicity, seized control. In July, another military coup place Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an option unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the mainly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern region, which declared its independence as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 5, 2016 at 5:00 pm
    Permalink

    In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first country to effectively check and eliminate the Ebola hazard that was ravaging three other nations in the West African region, as its unique way of contact tracing became an effective approach after used by other countries, such as the United States, when Ebola hazards were found.

  • May 5, 2016 at 5:07 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known because of its natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations such as Cross River National Park and Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense rainforest, savanna and infrequent primate habitats. Among its most recognizable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national currency.

  • May 5, 2016 at 5:14 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mostly in Muslims in the northern part, and the southern part of the country. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, for example those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  • May 5, 2016 at 5:20 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is a member of the MINT group of nations, which are broadly seen as the earth’s next “BRIC-like” economies. Additionally it is listed among the “Next Eleven” economies set to become among the largest on the planet. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the African Union, Nations, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  • May 5, 2016 at 5:27 pm
    Permalink

    During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined the huge revenue and OPEC generated made the economy richer. Despite enormous earnings from oil production and sale, the military administration did little help small and medium businesses, to improve the standard of living of the population, or invest in infrastructure. The government became the center of political battle and the brink of power in the nation as oil revenues fuelled the rise of federal subventions to states. As oil production and sales rose, the Nigerian authorities became increasingly determined by oil revenues and the international commodity markets for economical and budgetary concerns. It did not develop other sources of the market for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism in Nigeria.

  • May 5, 2016 at 5:33 pm
    Permalink

    As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in terms of nominal GDP and purchasing power parity respectively. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s biggest economy in 2014.Additionally, the debt-to-GDP ratio is only 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  • May 5, 2016 at 5:40 pm
    Permalink

    Since 2002, sectarian violence has been seen by the North East of the nation by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular system of government and create Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 promised that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 individuals crippled. At the exact same time, neighbouring countries, Chad, Benin, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to fight Boko Haram in the consequences of a world media emphasized the spread of Boko Haram attacks and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these nations.

  • May 5, 2016 at 5:46 pm
    Permalink

    On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a loose federation of self-governing states, the independent state confronted the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  • May 5, 2016 at 5:53 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mostly in Muslims in the northern part, and the southern area of the nation. A minority of the inhabitants practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, for example those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  • May 5, 2016 at 5:59 pm
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, generally referred to as Nigeria, is a federal constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its shore in the south lies on the Gulf of Guinea in the Atlantic Ocean. It consists of 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory, where the capital, Abuja is situated. Nigeria is officially a democratic laic nation.

  • May 5, 2016 at 6:06 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live largely in Muslims in the northern part, and the southern area of the country. A minority of the inhabitants practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as for example those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  • May 5, 2016 at 6:13 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is often referred to as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and market. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous nation in Africa and the seventh most populous nation on the planet.

  • May 5, 2016 at 6:19 pm
    Permalink

    The North East of the state has seen sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular system of government and create Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 maintained that Boko Haram strikes have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. Neighbouring states, at once, Chad, Benin, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to combat Boko Haram in the consequences of a world media emphasized the spread of Boko Haram assaults and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these nations.

  • May 5, 2016 at 6:25 pm
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, primarily of Ibo ethnicity, seized control. In July, another military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, a choice unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the mainly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven in the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence as the Republic of Biafra on May 30, 1967. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 5, 2016 at 6:32 pm
    Permalink

    The result of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. While Northern Cameroons chose to stay in Nigeria Southern Cameroon selected to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern part of the nation was now far larger as opposed to southern part. As its first president, the state created a Federal Republic in 1963. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power when elections were held in 1965.

  • May 5, 2016 at 6:38 pm
    Permalink

    An imbalance was created in the polity by the consequence of the 1961 plebiscite. While Northern Cameroons chose to stay in Nigeria Southern Cameroon elected to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern area of the state was now much bigger as opposed to southern part. The state created a Federal Republic, with Azikiwe. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria, when elections were held in 1965.

  • May 5, 2016 at 6:43 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria became a independent federation in 1960, and plunged into a civil war. It has since switched between democratically-elected civilian governments and military dictatorships, until it reached a secure democracy in 1999, with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be ran relatively freely and pretty.

  • May 5, 2016 at 6:50 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is frequently referred to as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous state in Africa and the seventh most populous state on the planet.

  • May 5, 2016 at 6:56 pm
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has one of the greatest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a transnational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with broad assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 5, 2016 at 7:02 pm
    Permalink

    Modern day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century, and the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up administrative and legal structures whilst practising indirect rule through conventional chiefdoms.

  • May 5, 2016 at 7:09 pm
    Permalink

    An imbalance was created in the polity by the result of the 1961 plebiscite. Southern Cameroon opted to join the Republic of Cameroon while Northern Cameroons decided to continue in Nigeria. The northern area of the country was now much larger than the southern area. In 1963, a Federal Republic was created by the nation, as its first president with Azikiwe. When elections were held in 1965, the Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria.

  • May 5, 2016 at 7:15 pm
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has among the greatest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a multinational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups talk over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with extensive variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 5, 2016 at 7:21 pm
    Permalink

    During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined the huge earnings and OPEC generated made the market richer. Despite huge earnings from oil production and sale, the military government did little to improve the standard of living of the population, help small and medium businesses, or spend money on infrastructure. The federal government became the center of political struggle and the brink of power in the nation as oil earnings fuelled the rise of national subventions to states. As oil production and revenue grew, the Nigerian authorities became increasingly determined by oil sales and the international commodity markets for budgetary and economical concerns. It didn’t develop other sources of the market for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism.

  • May 5, 2016 at 7:28 pm
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, generally referred to as Nigeria, is a federal constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its shore in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea. It contains the Federal Capital Territory and 36 states, where Abuja, the capital is situated. Nigeria is formally a secular nation that is democratic.

  • May 5, 2016 at 7:35 pm
    Permalink

    In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first state to effectively contain and remove the Ebola threat that was ravaging three other countries in the West African area, as its unique way of contact tracing became an effective method afterwards used by other states, such as the United States Of America, when Ebola hazards were discovered.

  • May 5, 2016 at 7:41 pm
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, usually referred to as Nigeria, is a national constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its shore in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea. It consists of the Federal Capital Territory and 36 states, where Abuja, the capital is located. Nigeria is officially a secular country that is democratic.

  • May 5, 2016 at 7:47 pm
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has one of the biggest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a transnational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups talk over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with extensive variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 5, 2016 at 7:54 pm
    Permalink

    On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a loose federation of self governing states, the independent nation confronted the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  • May 5, 2016 at 8:01 pm
    Permalink

    The North East of the nation has seen sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular system of government and create Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 claimed that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 individuals crippled. At exactly the same time, neighbouring nations, Chad, Benin, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to battle Boko Haram in the aftermath of a world media emphasized the spread of Boko Haram strikes and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these nations.

  • May 5, 2016 at 8:07 pm
    Permalink

    During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined OPEC and the huge sales created made the market more affluent. Despite huge earnings from oil production and sale, the military administration did little help small and medium businesses, to enhance the standard of living of the population, or purchase infrastructure. The federal government became the centre of political struggle and the brink of power in the state, as petroleum revenues fuelled the rise of national subventions to states. As oil production and sales grew, the Nigerian government became increasingly determined by petroleum revenues and the international commodity markets for budgetary and economic concerns. It didn’t develop other sources of the economy for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism.

  • May 5, 2016 at 8:14 pm
    Permalink

    Since 2002, sectarian violence has been found by the North East of the nation by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular process of government and create Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 maintained that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 individuals crippled. Neighbouring countries, at the same time, Niger, Chad, Cameroon and Benin joined Nigeria in a combined effort to fight Boko Haram in the consequences of a world media emphasized the spread of Boko Haram attacks and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these countries.

  • May 5, 2016 at 8:20 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is considered to be an emergent marketplace by the World Bank;It has already been identified as an emerging global power, and has been identified as a regional power on the African continent, a middle power in international affairs.

  • May 5, 2016 at 8:27 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria gained independence from the UK as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) headed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition comprised the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), which was largely dominated by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 5, 2016 at 8:33 pm
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has among the largest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a multinational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups talk over 500 different languages, and are identified with broad variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 5, 2016 at 8:40 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria gained independence from the UK as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) headed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition consisted of the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), which was mostly dominated by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 5, 2016 at 8:47 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is thought of as an emergent market by the World Bank;It has been identified as a regional power a central power in international affairs, on the African continent, and contains already been identified as an emerging global power.

  • May 5, 2016 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    The result of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. Southern Cameroon opted to join the Republic of Cameroon while Northern Cameroons decided to remain in Nigeria. The northern area of the state was now far larger than the southern part. In 1963, a Federal Republic was established by the nation, as its first president with Azikiwe. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria, when elections were held in 1965.

  • May 5, 2016 at 8:59 pm
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, chiefly of Ibo ethnicity, seized control. In July, a second military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the mostly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven in the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:05 pm
    Permalink

    Since 2002, the North East of the country has found sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the lay system of government and create Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 maintained that Boko Haram attacks have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. At once, neighbouring nations, Benin, Chad, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to combat Boko Haram in the aftermath of a world media emphasized kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls and the spread of Boko Haram attacks to these nations.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:11 pm
    Permalink

    As of 2015, Nigeria is the 20th largest economy, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in relation to nominal GDP and purchasing power parity respectively of the world. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s largest economy in 2014.Additionally, the debt-to-GDP ratio is only 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:18 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria gained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1 October 1960. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) directed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition comprised the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), which was largely controlled by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:24 pm
    Permalink

    During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined OPEC and the huge earnings generated made the market richer. Despite enormous earnings from sale and oil production, the military government did little help medium and small businesses, to improve the standard of living of the population, or spend money on infrastructure. The government became the center of political battle and the threshold of power in the nation, as oil sales fuelled the rise of national subventions to states. As oil production and revenue grew, the Nigerian government became increasingly dependent on petroleum revenues and the international commodity markets for economic and budgetary concerns. It didn’t develop other sources of the market for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:31 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is thought of as an emerging market by the World Bank;It has also been identified as an emerging global power, and has been identified as a regional power on the African continent, a central power in international affairs.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:38 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is often referred to as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa and the seventh most populous state on earth.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:44 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria gained independence from the United Kingdom as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) headed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition included the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), that was mostly controlled by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:51 pm
    Permalink

    During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined the enormous earnings and OPEC created made the economy more loaded. Despite huge earnings from oil production and sale, the military administration did little to enhance the standard of living of the population, help medium and small businesses, or invest in infrastructure. As petroleum revenues fuelled the rise of national subventions to states, the government became the threshold of power and the center of political battle in the country. As oil production and sales rose, the Nigerian government became increasingly determined by petroleum revenues and the international commodity markets for budgetary and economical concerns. It failed to develop other sources of the economy for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism.

  • May 5, 2016 at 9:58 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mainly in Muslims in the northern part, and the southern part of the country. A minority of the inhabitants practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, including those native to Yoruba and Igbo peoples.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:04 pm
    Permalink

    An imbalance was created in the polity by the consequence of the 1961 plebiscite. Southern Cameroon elected to join the Republic of Cameroon while Northern Cameroons decided to stay in Nigeria. The northern part of the state was now far larger compared to the southern part. In 1963, a Federal Republic was established by the country, as its first president with Azikiwe. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria when elections were held in 1965.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:11 pm
    Permalink

    On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria attained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a loose federation of self-governing states, the independent state faced the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:17 pm
    Permalink

    Modern day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule starting in the 19th century, and the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:24 pm
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, normally known as Nigeria, is a federal constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its shore in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea. It contains 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory, where Abuja, the capital is situated. Nigeria is formally a democratic laic state.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:31 pm
    Permalink

    Since 2002, sectarian violence has been seen by the North East of the country by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular system of government and create Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 promised that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 individuals crippled. Neighbouring nations, at once, Cameroon, Chad, Benin and Niger joined Nigeria in an united effort to combat Boko Haram in the consequences of a world media highlighted the spread of Boko Haram attacks and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these nations.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:38 pm
    Permalink

    In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first state to effectively control and eliminate the Ebola hazard that was ravaging three other countries in the West African area, as its unique approach to contact tracing became an effective method afterwards used by other states, such as the United States, when Ebola hazards were discovered.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:45 pm
    Permalink

    As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, purchasing power parity respectively and worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in relation to nominal GDP. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s largest market in 2014.Additionally, the debt-to-GDP ratio is only 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:52 pm
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, usually known as Nigeria, is a federal constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its coast in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea. It consists of the Federal Capital Territory and 36 states, where Abuja, the capital is located. Nigeria is officially a laic nation that is democratic.

  • May 5, 2016 at 10:59 pm
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    Nigeria is an associate of the MINT group of nations, which are widely viewed as the world’s next “BRIC-like” economies. It is also recorded among the “Next Eleven” economies set to become among the biggest on earth. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the African Union, Nations, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:06 pm
    Permalink

    On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria attained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a loose federation of self governing states, the independent state confronted the overwhelming task of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:12 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known for its natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations including Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and rare primate habitats and Cross River National Park. Among its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national currency.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:19 pm
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has one of the biggest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a multinational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with broad variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:25 pm
    Permalink

    In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first country to effectively control and remove the Ebola threat that was ravaging three other nations in the West African area, as its exceptional way of contact tracing became an effective system afterwards used by other nations, including the United States, when Ebola hazards were discovered.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:32 pm
    Permalink

    Since 2002, sectarian violence has been seen by the North East of the nation by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular process of government and establish Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 asserted that Boko Haram attacks have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. Neighbouring nations, at exactly the same time, Chad, Benin, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to battle Boko Haram in the consequences of a world media highlighted the spread of Boko Haram assaults and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these nations.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:39 pm
    Permalink

    An African country on the Gulf of Guinea, Nigeria, is known for wildlife reserves and its natural landmarks. Safari destinations including Cross River National Park and Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense rainforest, savanna and infrequent primate habitats. One of its most recognizable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national money.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:45 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria gained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) headed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition included the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), that has been largely dominated by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:52 pm
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has among the largest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a multinational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with broad variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 5, 2016 at 11:59 pm
    Permalink

    In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first country to effectively check and eliminate the Ebola threat that was ravaging three other states in the West African region, as its unique method of contact tracing became an effective technique afterwards used by other countries, like the United States, when Ebola threats were discovered.

  • May 6, 2016 at 12:06 am
    Permalink

    In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first country to effectively check and eliminate the Ebola danger that was ravaging three other countries in the West African area, as its unique approach to contact tracing became an effective process afterwards used by other nations, including the United States Of America, when Ebola dangers were found.

  • May 6, 2016 at 12:13 am
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mainly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, another military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, a choice unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from your north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 6, 2016 at 12:20 am
    Permalink

    Modernday Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  • May 6, 2016 at 12:27 am
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    Nigeria is frequently referred to as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and market. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa and the seventh most populous state on earth.

  • May 6, 2016 at 12:34 am
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has among the greatest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a multinational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 different languages, and are identified with extensive variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 6, 2016 at 12:41 am
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mainly of Ibo ethnicity, seized control. In July, another military coup place Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 6, 2016 at 12:48 am
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    As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest market, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in terms of nominal GDP and purchasing power parity respectively. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s biggest economy in 2014.Additionally, the debt-to-GDP ratio is only 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  • May 6, 2016 at 12:55 am
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has among the largest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a multinational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with broad variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 6, 2016 at 1:02 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria, one third larger than Texas and the most populous country in Africa, is situated in West Africa on the Gulf of Guinea. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower course of the Niger River flows south through the western part of the state into the Gulf of Guinea. Mangrove forests and swamps border the southern shore; inland are hardwood forests.

  • May 6, 2016 at 1:10 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known for wildlife reserves and its natural landmarks. Safari destinations for example Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and infrequent primate habitats and Cross River National Park. One of its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national currency.

  • May 6, 2016 at 1:17 am
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mainly of Ibo ethnicity, seized control. In July, a second military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an option unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the mostly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven in the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern region, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 6, 2016 at 1:24 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mainly in the southern part of the nation, and Muslims in the northern part. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  • May 6, 2016 at 1:31 am
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mostly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, another military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven in the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern region, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 6, 2016 at 1:39 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria, one third larger than Texas and the most populous country in Africa, is situated in West Africa on the Gulf of Guinea. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower course of the Niger River flows south through the western part of the country into the Gulf of Guinea. Swamps and mangrove forests border the southern coast; inland are hardwood forests.

  • May 6, 2016 at 1:46 am
    Permalink

    An African country on the Gulf of Guinea, Nigeria, is known because of its natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations including Cross River National Park and Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense rainforest, savanna and rare primate habitats. Among its most recognizable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national money.

  • May 6, 2016 at 1:52 am
    Permalink

    The North East of the country has seen sectarian violence an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the lay system of government and establish Sharia law, by Boko Haram. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 promised that Boko Haram attacks have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 individuals crippled. Neighbouring countries, at exactly the same time, Cameroon, Chad, Benin and Niger joined Nigeria in an united effort to fight Boko Haram in the wake of a world media highlighted kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls and the spread of Boko Haram attacks to these countries.

  • May 6, 2016 at 1:59 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is thought of as an emergent market by the World Bank;It has been identified as a regional power on the African continent, a central power in international affairs, and has also been identified as an emerging global power.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:06 am
    Permalink

    Since 2002, sectarian violence has been found by the North East of the state by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the lay system of government and establish Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 asserted that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. At exactly the same time, neighbouring states, Niger, Chad, Cameroon and Benin joined Nigeria in a combined effort to combat Boko Haram in the wake of a world media highlighted the spread of Boko Haram assaults and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these countries.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:13 am
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has one of the greatest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a multinational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups talk over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with extensive assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:21 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria plunged into a civil war, and became a formally independent federation in 1960. It’s since alternated between democratically-elected civilian governments and military dictatorships, until it reached a secure democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be conducted moderately fairly and freely, in 1999.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:27 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria, one third larger than Texas and the most populous nation in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea in West Africa. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower path of the Niger River flows south through the western area of the country into the Gulf of Guinea. Mangrove forests and swamps border the southern shore; inland are hardwood forests.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:35 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria, one third bigger than Texas and the most populous country in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea in West Africa. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower path of the Niger River flows south through the western part of the country into the Gulf of Guinea. Mangrove forests and swamps border the southern coast; inland are hardwood woods.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:42 am
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has one of the largest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a multinational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups talk over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with extensive variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:49 am
    Permalink

    An imbalance was created in the polity by the result of the 1961 plebiscite. While Northern Cameroons decided to stay in Nigeria Southern Cameroon selected to join the Republic of Cameroon,. The northern area of the nation was now far bigger compared to the southern area. In 1963, the state established a Federal Republic, as its first president with Azikiwe. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria, when elections were held in 1965.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:57 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria, one-third bigger than Texas and the most populous country in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea in West Africa. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower course of the Niger River flows south through the western area of the nation into the Gulf of Guinea. Swamps and mangrove forests border the southern shore; inland are hardwood woods.

  • May 6, 2016 at 3:04 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is frequently called the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous state in Africa and the seventh most populous country on earth.

  • May 6, 2016 at 3:11 am
    Permalink

    The consequence of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. While Northern Cameroons chose to continue in Nigeria Southern Cameroon picked to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern area of the state was now far larger as opposed to southern part. In 1963, the state established a Federal Republic, with Azikiwe. When elections were held in 1965, the Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria.

  • May 6, 2016 at 3:19 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known for wildlife reserves and its natural landmarks. Safari destinations like Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and infrequent primate habitats and Cross River National Park. Among its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- .

  • May 6, 2016 at 3:26 am
    Permalink

    Modern-day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century, and the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up administrative and legal structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  • May 6, 2016 at 3:34 am
    Permalink

    Modernday Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule starting in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up administrative and legal structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  • May 6, 2016 at 3:42 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mostly in Muslims in the northern area, and the southern area of the country. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as for instance those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  • May 6, 2016 at 3:49 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria became a independent federation in 1960, and plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970. It’s since alternated between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it achieved a secure democracy in 1999, with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed as the first to be ran reasonably freely and pretty.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:04 am
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has one of the largest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a multinational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 different languages, and are identified with wide assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:12 am
    Permalink

    Modern-day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule starting in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up administrative and legal structures whilst practising indirect rule through conventional chiefdoms.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:19 am
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mainly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, another military coup place Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an option unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:26 am
    Permalink

    Since 2002, the North East of the nation has seen sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the lay process of government and create Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 asserted that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. At the exact same time, neighbouring countries, Chad, Benin, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to combat Boko Haram in the consequences of a world media emphasized kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls and the spread of Boko Haram attacks to these countries.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:34 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria attained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1 October 1960. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) headed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition comprised the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), which was mostly dominated by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:40 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria, one-third bigger than Texas and the most populous nation in Africa, is situated in West Africa on the Gulf of Guinea. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower path of the Niger River flows south through the western part of the state into the Gulf of Guinea. Mangrove forests and swamps border the southern shore; inland are hardwood forests.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:48 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria, one third bigger than Texas and the most populous nation in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea in West Africa. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower path of the Niger River flows south through the western area of the nation into the Gulf of Guinea. Mangrove forests and swamps border the southern shore; inland are hardwood woods.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:55 am
    Permalink

    The consequence of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. While Northern Cameroons decided to continue in Nigeria Southern Cameroon picked to join the Republic of Cameroon,. The northern part of the state was now far bigger than the southern area. The country created a Federal Republic, as its first president with Azikiwe. When elections were held in 1965, the Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in Nigeria’s Western Region.

  • May 6, 2016 at 5:03 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is regarded as an emerging market by the World Bank;It has already been identified as an emerging global power, and has been identified as a regional power on the African continent, a central power in international affairs.

  • May 6, 2016 at 5:18 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria gained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) directed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition consisted of the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), which was largely controlled by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 6, 2016 at 5:26 am
    Permalink

    On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria attained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a loose federation of self governing states, the independent state confronted the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  • May 6, 2016 at 5:41 am
    Permalink

    During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined the tremendous sales and OPEC generated made the market more loaded. Despite enormous revenues from sale and oil production, the military government did little help medium and small businesses, to enhance the standard of living of the population, or put money into infrastructure. The government became the centre of political battle and the brink of power in the state, as petroleum revenues fuelled the rise of federal subventions to states. As oil production and sales rose, the Nigerian authorities became increasingly determined by oil revenues and the international commodity markets for economical and budgetary concerns. It failed to develop other sources of the economy for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism in Nigeria.

  • May 6, 2016 at 5:49 am
    Permalink

    On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a loose federation of self governing states, the independent state confronted the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  • May 6, 2016 at 5:56 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is often known as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and market. With about 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous state in Africa and the seventh most populous state in the world.

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:04 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria, one-third bigger than Texas and the most populous nation in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea in West Africa. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower path of the Niger River flows south through the western part of the country into the Gulf of Guinea. Swamps and mangrove forests border the southern coast; inland are hardwood forests.

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:11 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970, and became a federation that was formally independent in 1960. It’s since alternated between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it attained a secure democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed as the first to be ran moderately fairly and freely.

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:19 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live largely in Muslims in the northern area, and the southern area of the country. A minority of the population practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, for example those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:26 am
    Permalink

    The North East of the country has seen sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular process of government and create Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 asserted that Boko Haram strikes have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 individuals crippled. Neighbouring nations, at the exact same time, Chad, Benin, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in an united effort to combat Boko Haram in the wake of a world media highlighted the spread of Boko Haram assaults and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these nations.

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:34 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is frequently called the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous nation in Africa and the seventh most populous nation on the planet.

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:42 am
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has among the largest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a multinational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups talk over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with extensive assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:49 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is regarded as an emergent market by the World Bank;It has also been identified as an emerging global power, and continues to be identified as a regional power on the African continent, a middle power in international affairs.

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:57 am
    Permalink

    The North East of the country has seen sectarian violence an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular process of government and create Sharia law, by Boko Haram. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 asserted that Boko Haram attacks have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. Neighbouring nations, at the exact same time, Niger, Chad, Cameroon and Benin joined Nigeria in an united effort to battle Boko Haram in the aftermath of a world media emphasized the spread of Boko Haram assaults and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these countries.

  • May 6, 2016 at 7:04 am
    Permalink

    As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, worth $1 trillion and more than $500 billion in terms of nominal GDP and purchasing power parity respectively. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s largest economy in 2014.Additionally, the debt-to-GDP ratio is only 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  • May 6, 2016 at 7:12 am
    Permalink

    In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first nation to effectively control and remove the Ebola hazard that was ravaging three other states in the West African area, as its exceptional method of contact tracing became an effective approach after used by other nations, like the Usa, when Ebola risks were discovered.

  • May 6, 2016 at 7:19 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is an associate of the MINT group of states, which are widely seen as the earth’s next “BRIC-like” markets. It’s also recorded among the “Next Eleven” economies set to become among the biggest on earth. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the United Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and Nations amongst other international organisations.

  • May 6, 2016 at 7:26 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria became a federation that was formally independent in 1960, and plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970. It has since switched between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it achieved a secure democracy in 1999, with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be conducted reasonably pretty and freely.

  • May 6, 2016 at 7:34 am
    Permalink

    Modern-day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up administrative and legal structures whilst practising indirect rule through conventional chiefdoms.

  • May 6, 2016 at 7:41 am
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mainly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, another military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from your north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 6, 2016 at 7:49 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is a member of the MINT group of countries, which are widely seen as the world’s next “BRIC-like” markets. Additionally it is recorded among the “Next Eleven” economies set to become among the largest on earth. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the United Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and Nations amongst other international organisations.

  • May 6, 2016 at 7:56 am
    Permalink

    Since 2002, the North East of the country has found sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the lay system of government and create Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 asserted that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. Neighbouring nations, at the same time, Niger, Chad, Cameroon and Benin joined Nigeria in a combined effort to combat Boko Haram in the aftermath of a world media highlighted kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls and the spread of Boko Haram strikes to these countries.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:04 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria, one third bigger than Texas and the most populous nation in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower path of the Niger River flows south through the western area of the nation into the Gulf of Guinea. Swamps and mangrove forests border the southern shore; inland are hardwood forests.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:12 am
    Permalink

    As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in relation to nominal GDP and purchasing power parity respectively. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s largest economy in 2014.Also, the debt-to-GDP ratio is just 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:20 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is regarded as an emergent marketplace by the World Bank;It continues to be identified as a regional power on the African continent, a central power in international affairs, and has already been identified as an emerging global power.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:28 am
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has among the biggest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a multinational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups talk over 500 different languages, and are identified with broad assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:35 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is thought of as an emerging marketplace by the World Bank;It has also been identified as an emerging global power, and has been identified as a regional power a central power in international affairs, on the African continent.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:43 am
    Permalink

    During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined the tremendous revenue and OPEC created made the market richer. Despite enormous revenues from oil production and sale, the military government did little to enhance the standard of living of the population, help medium and small businesses, or invest in infrastructure. As oil sales fuelled the rise of federal subventions to states, the government became the centre of political battle and the threshold of power in the state. As oil production and sales climbed, the Nigerian authorities became increasingly dependent on oil sales and the international commodity markets for budgetary and economical concerns. It did not develop other sources of the economy for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:51 am
    Permalink

    Modern-day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule starting in the 19th century, and the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:59 am
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has among the greatest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a multinational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups talk over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with wide variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 6, 2016 at 9:07 am
    Permalink

    On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a free federation of self governing states, the independent state confronted the overwhelming task of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  • May 6, 2016 at 9:15 am
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, commonly known as Nigeria, is a federal constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its coast in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea. It consists of the Federal Capital Territory and 36 states, where Abuja, the capital is situated. Nigeria is formally a democratic secular country.

  • May 6, 2016 at 9:22 am
    Permalink

    As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, purchasing power parity and worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in terms of nominal GDP. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s biggest economy in 2014.Additionally, the debt-to-GDP ratio is just 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  • May 6, 2016 at 9:30 am
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mainly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, a second military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, a choice unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from your north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 6, 2016 at 9:38 am
    Permalink

    As of 2015, Nigeria is the 20th largest market, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in terms of nominal GDP and purchasing power parity of the world. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s biggest economy in 2014.Also, the debt-to-GDP ratio is just 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  • May 6, 2016 at 9:46 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is thought of as an emerging marketplace by the World Bank;It has already been identified as an emerging global power, and continues to be identified as a regional power a middle power in international affairs, on the African continent.

  • May 6, 2016 at 9:54 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria attained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) headed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition included the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), which was mainly controlled by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 6, 2016 at 10:01 am
    Permalink

    In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first nation to effectively contain and remove the Ebola hazard that was ravaging three other countries in the West African area, as its unique method of contact tracing became an effective approach after used by other countries, like the United States Of America, when Ebola risks were discovered.

  • May 6, 2016 at 10:08 am
    Permalink

    An imbalance was created in the polity by the result of the 1961 plebiscite. While Northern Cameroons chose to continue in Nigeria Southern Cameroon chosen to join the Republic of Cameroon,. The northern area of the state was now much larger than the southern area. The state created a Federal Republic, as its first president with Azikiwe. When elections were held in 1965, the Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria.

  • May 6, 2016 at 10:15 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria attained independence from the UK as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) led by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition comprised the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), that has been mainly dominated by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 6, 2016 at 10:23 am
    Permalink

    As of 2015, Nigeria is the 20th largest economy, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in terms of nominal GDP and purchasing power parity of the world. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s biggest economy in 2014.Also, the debt-to-GDP ratio is just 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  • May 6, 2016 at 10:30 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is a part of the MINT group of states, which are broadly seen as the earth’s next “BRIC-like” economies. It is also recorded among the “Next Eleven” markets set to become among the largest on earth. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  • May 6, 2016 at 10:37 am
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, generally known as Nigeria, is a national constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its coast in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea. Where the capital, Abuja is located, it comprises 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory. Nigeria is formally a democratic secular state.

  • May 6, 2016 at 10:44 am
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, generally referred to as Nigeria, is a national constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its coast in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea. It consists of 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory, where the capital, Abuja is located. Nigeria is formally a secular country that is democratic.

  • May 6, 2016 at 10:52 am
    Permalink

    The result of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. Southern Cameroon selected to join the Republic of Cameroon while Northern Cameroons chose to continue in Nigeria. The northern area of the state was now far bigger than the southern area. The country created a Federal Republic, as its first president with Azikiwe. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power when elections were held in 1965.

  • May 6, 2016 at 11:00 am
    Permalink

    Modern-day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule starting in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through conventional chiefdoms.

  • May 6, 2016 at 11:07 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live largely in Muslims in the northern area, and the southern part of the country. A minority of the population practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  • May 6, 2016 at 11:14 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is frequently known as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous state in Africa and the seventh most populous state in the world.

  • May 6, 2016 at 11:22 am
    Permalink

    As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest market, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in relation to nominal GDP and purchasing power parity. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s largest market in 2014.Also, the debt-to-GDP ratio is only 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  • May 6, 2016 at 11:30 am
    Permalink

    On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a free federation of self governing states, the independent state faced the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  • May 6, 2016 at 11:38 am
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has among the greatest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a multinational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups talk over 500 different languages, and are identified with extensive assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 6, 2016 at 11:46 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria is a member of the MINT group of nations, which are broadly seen as the earth’s next “BRIC-like” economies. It’s also listed among the “Next Eleven” markets set to become among the biggest on the planet. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the United Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and Nations amongst other international organisations.

  • May 6, 2016 at 11:54 am
    Permalink

    Nigeria, one third bigger than Texas and the most populous country in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea in West Africa. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower course of the Niger River flows south through the western part of the state into the Gulf of Guinea. Mangrove forests and swamps border the southern coast; inland are hardwood forests.

  • May 6, 2016 at 12:02 pm
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, generally called Nigeria, is a federal constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its coast in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea. Where the capital, Abuja is situated, it contains 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory. Nigeria is officially a democratic laic state.

  • May 6, 2016 at 12:11 pm
    Permalink

    On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria attained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a loose federation of self-governing states, the independent state faced the overwhelming task of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  • May 6, 2016 at 12:19 pm
    Permalink

    On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria attained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a free federation of self governing states, the independent nation faced the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  • May 6, 2016 at 12:27 pm
    Permalink

    Modernday Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule starting in the 19th century, and the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  • May 6, 2016 at 12:35 pm
    Permalink

    An imbalance was created in the polity by the result of the 1961 plebiscite. Southern Cameroon preferred to join the Republic of Cameroon while Northern Cameroons chose to remain in Nigeria. The northern part of the nation was now far larger as opposed to southern area. The country created a Federal Republic, with Azikiwe. When elections were held in 1965, the Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria.

  • May 6, 2016 at 12:44 pm
    Permalink

    An African country on the Gulf of Guinea, Nigeria, is known for its natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations including Cross River National Park and Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense rainforest, savanna and rare primate habitats. Among its most recognizable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national currency.

  • May 6, 2016 at 12:58 pm
    Permalink

    Modern day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule starting in the 19th century, and the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  • May 6, 2016 at 1:06 pm
    Permalink

    Modern-day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century, and the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through conventional chiefdoms.

  • May 6, 2016 at 1:14 pm
    Permalink

    In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first nation to effectively control and remove the Ebola threat that was ravaging three other countries in the West African area, as its unique way of contact tracing became an effective strategy afterwards used by other nations, including the Usa, when Ebola threats were found.

  • May 6, 2016 at 1:21 pm
    Permalink

    Modern-day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up administrative and legal structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  • May 6, 2016 at 1:29 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria gained independence from the UK as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) headed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition consisted of the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), that was mainly dominated by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 6, 2016 at 1:37 pm
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has among the biggest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a multinational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 different languages, and are identified with wide assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 6, 2016 at 1:53 pm
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mainly of Ibo ethnicity, seized control. In July, another military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the mainly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven in the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:01 pm
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, typically referred to as Nigeria, is a federal constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its shore in the south lies on the Gulf of Guinea. It comprises 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory, where the capital, Abuja is located. Nigeria is officially a democratic secular state.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:08 pm
    Permalink

    The result of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. Southern Cameroon opted to join the Republic of Cameroon while Northern Cameroons decided to stay in Nigeria. The northern part of the state was now much larger compared to the southern area. In 1963, a Federal Republic was created by the nation, with Azikiwe as its first president. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria, when elections were held in 1965.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:16 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known for its natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations like Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense rainforest, savanna and infrequent primate habitats and Cross River National Park. Among its most recognizable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national currency.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:23 pm
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, predominantly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, a second military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:31 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is regarded as an emerging marketplace by the World Bank;It has also been identified as an emerging global power, and continues to be identified as a regional power on the African continent, a middle power in international affairs.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:38 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is frequently known as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With about 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous state in Africa and the seventh most populous state in the world.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:46 pm
    Permalink

    As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest market, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in relation to nominal GDP and purchasing power parity. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s largest market in 2014.Also, the debt-to-GDP ratio is just 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  • May 6, 2016 at 2:54 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known for wildlife reserves and its natural landmarks. Safari destinations for example Cross River National Park and Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and rare primate habitats. Among its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- .

  • May 6, 2016 at 3:01 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live largely in the southern part of the nation, and Muslims in the northern part. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as for example those native to Yoruba and Igbo peoples.

  • May 6, 2016 at 3:09 pm
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, primarily of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, a second military coup put Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, a choice unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven in the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 6, 2016 at 3:16 pm
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has one of the biggest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a multinational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups talk over 500 different languages, and are identified with broad variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 6, 2016 at 3:24 pm
    Permalink

    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mainly of Ibo ethnicity, seized control. In July, a second military coup put Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern region, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 6, 2016 at 3:30 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is a member of the MINT group of countries, which are widely viewed as the globe’s next “BRIC-like” economies. It is also recorded among the “Next Eleven” markets set to become among the largest in the world. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the United Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and Nations amongst other international organisations.

  • May 6, 2016 at 3:38 pm
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has among the largest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a multinational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 different languages, and are identified with wide assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 6, 2016 at 3:45 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria became a independent federation in 1960, and plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970. It has since alternated between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it achieved a secure democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be conducted pretty pretty and freely.

  • May 6, 2016 at 3:52 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria gained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1 October 1960. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) led by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition included the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), which was mostly controlled by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:00 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mainly in Muslims in the northern area, and the southern part of the state. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:07 pm
    Permalink

    An African country on the Gulf of Guinea, Nigeria, is known because of its natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations for example Cross River National Park and Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense rainforest, savanna and infrequent primate habitats. Among its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national money.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:15 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is regarded as an emerging marketplace by the World Bank;It has already been identified as an emerging global power, and has been identified as a regional power on the African continent, a middle power in international affairs.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:22 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is frequently called the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With about 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous state in Africa and the seventh most populous country on earth.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:30 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is a member of the MINT group of states, which are broadly seen as the world’s next “BRIC-like” economies. It’s also listed among the “Next Eleven” economies set to become among the largest on the planet. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:36 pm
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, usually referred to as Nigeria, is a federal constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its shore in the south lies on the Gulf of Guinea. It comprises the Federal Capital Territory and 36 states, where the capital, Abuja is situated. Nigeria is formally a laic country that is democratic.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:44 pm
    Permalink

    As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, worth $1 trillion and more than $500 billion in terms of nominal GDP and purchasing power parity. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s biggest market in 2014.Additionally, the debt-to-GDP ratio is just 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:51 pm
    Permalink

    In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first nation to effectively contain and remove the Ebola hazard that was ravaging three other countries in the West African area, as its unique approach to contact tracing became an effective strategy afterwards used by other states, like the Usa, when Ebola threats were found.

  • May 6, 2016 at 4:58 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is often known as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and market. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous state in Africa and the seventh most populous nation on earth.

  • May 6, 2016 at 5:06 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria gained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1 October 1960. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) led by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition comprised the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), that has been mostly dominated by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 6, 2016 at 5:14 pm
    Permalink

    {Nigeria has among the largest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a transnational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with broad variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 6, 2016 at 5:21 pm
    Permalink

    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, normally referred to as Nigeria, is a federal constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its shore in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea. Where the capital, Abuja is situated, it consists of 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory. Nigeria is formally a democratic secular country.

  • May 6, 2016 at 5:29 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria plunged into a civil war, and became a federation that was independent in 1960. It has since switched between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it attained a stable democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be ran pretty pretty and freely.

  • May 6, 2016 at 5:36 pm
    Permalink

    Modern-day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  • May 6, 2016 at 5:44 pm
    Permalink

    An African country on the Gulf of Guinea, Nigeria, is known for the natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations for example Cross River National Park and Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and infrequent primate habitats. One of its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- .

  • May 6, 2016 at 5:50 pm
    Permalink

    During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined OPEC and the enormous earnings created made the economy more loaded. Despite huge earnings from oil production and sale, the military administration did little help small and medium businesses, to improve the standard of living of the population, or put money into infrastructure. As petroleum earnings fuelled the rise of federal subventions to states, the government became the center of political struggle and the threshold of power in the country. As oil production and sales climbed, the Nigerian government became increasingly determined by oil sales and the international commodity markets for economical and budgetary concerns. It didn’t develop other sources of the economy for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism.

  • May 6, 2016 at 5:57 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live largely in the southern part of the country, and Muslims in the northern part. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:05 pm
    Permalink

    In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first state to effectively check and eliminate the Ebola threat that was ravaging three other nations in the West African area, as its unique method of contact tracing became an effective strategy after used by other states, like the United States, when Ebola hazards were discovered.

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:12 pm
    Permalink

    Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known for wildlife reserves and its natural landmarks. Safari destinations such as Cross River National Park and Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and rare primate habitats. One of its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- .

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:20 pm
    Permalink

    As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest market, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in terms of nominal GDP and purchasing power parity. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s largest market in 2014.Additionally, the debt-to-GDP ratio is only 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:28 pm
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    Nigeria became a federation that was formally independent in 1960, and plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970. It has since switched between democratically-elected civilian governments and military dictatorships, until it achieved a secure democracy in 1999, with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be conducted pretty fairly and freely.

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:35 pm
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    The result of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. While Northern Cameroons decided to continue in Nigeria Southern Cameroon chosen to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern part of the country was now far bigger as opposed to southern part. In 1963, the state established a Federal Republic, with Azikiwe as its first president. When elections were held in 1965, the Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power.

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:43 pm
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    Nigeria is considered to be an emerging marketplace by the World Bank;It continues to be identified as a regional power a central power in international affairs, on the African continent, and has already been identified as an emerging global power.

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:50 pm
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    Nigeria attained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) led by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition comprised the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), which was mostly controlled by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 6, 2016 at 6:58 pm
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    During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined OPEC and the enormous sales created made the economy richer. Despite enormous earnings from oil production and sale, the military administration did little to improve the standard of living of the population, help medium and small businesses, or purchase infrastructure. The government became the center of political struggle and the brink of power in the country as oil earnings fuelled the rise of federal subventions to states. As oil production and sales rose, the Nigerian authorities became increasingly dependent on petroleum sales and the international commodity markets for economic and budgetary concerns. It did not develop other sources of the market for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism.

  • May 6, 2016 at 7:06 pm
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    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mostly in the southern area of the nation, and Muslims in the northern area. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, including those native to Yoruba and Igbo peoples.

  • May 6, 2016 at 7:13 pm
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    Nigeria gained independence from the United Kingdom as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) directed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition comprised the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), that has been largely controlled by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 6, 2016 at 7:21 pm
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    Nigeria became a federation that was independent in 1960, and plunged into a civil war. It’s since alternated between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it achieved a secure democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be ran moderately freely and fairly.

  • May 6, 2016 at 7:29 pm
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    Nigeria became a federation that was formally independent in 1960, and plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970. It’s since switched between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it reached a stable democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be ran relatively freely and pretty, in 1999.

  • May 6, 2016 at 7:37 pm
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    Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, predominantly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, another military coup place Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, a choice unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence as the Republic of Biafra on May 30, 1967. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  • May 6, 2016 at 7:44 pm
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    Nigeria is considered to be an emerging marketplace by the World Bank;It has already been identified as an emerging global power, and has been identified as a regional power on the African continent, a middle power in international affairs.

  • May 6, 2016 at 7:52 pm
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    The Federal Republic of Nigeria, usually referred to as Nigeria, is a national constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its shore in the south lies on the Gulf of Guinea. Where the capital, Abuja is situated, it contains 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory. Nigeria is officially a democratic secular nation.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:00 pm
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    In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first state to effectively contain and eliminate the Ebola threat that was ravaging three other states in the West African area, as its unique approach to contact tracing became an effective technique afterwards used by other states, including the Usa, when Ebola dangers were found.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:08 pm
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    {Nigeria has among the largest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a transnational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 different languages, and are identified with extensive assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:15 pm
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    Nigeria became a federation that was formally independent in 1960, and plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970. It’s since switched between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it reached a secure democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be ran relatively pretty and freely.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:23 pm
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    The North East of the country has seen sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular system of government and establish Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 maintained that Boko Haram attacks have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 individuals crippled. At the same time, neighbouring nations, Cameroon, Chad, Benin and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to battle Boko Haram in the wake of a world media highlighted the spread of Boko Haram strikes and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these countries.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:30 pm
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    Nigeria gained independence from the UK as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) led by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition comprised the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), that was mainly dominated by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:37 pm
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    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live largely in Muslims in the northern area, and the southern area of the country. A minority of the inhabitants practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, including those native to Yoruba and Igbo peoples.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:44 pm
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    Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mainly in the southern part of the state, and Muslims in the northern area. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, like those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:51 pm
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    Nigeria is a part of the MINT group of states, which are broadly viewed as the world’s next “BRIC-like” markets. Additionally it is recorded among the “Next Eleven” markets set to become among the biggest on the planet. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  • May 6, 2016 at 8:58 pm
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    Nigeria plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970, and became a formally independent federation in 1960. It has since switched between democratically-elected civilian governments and military dictatorships, until it achieved a secure democracy in 1999, with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed as the first to be conducted moderately freely and pretty.

  • May 6, 2016 at 9:05 pm
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    During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined the enormous sales and OPEC generated made the economy richer. Despite huge earnings from oil production and sale, the military administration did little help medium and small businesses, to improve the standard of living of the population, or invest in infrastructure. As petroleum earnings fuelled the rise of national subventions the government became the brink of power and the centre of political struggle in the state. As oil production and sales climbed, the Nigerian authorities became increasingly dependent on petroleum revenues and the international commodity markets for budgetary and economic concerns. It didn’t develop other sources of the market for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism.

  • May 6, 2016 at 9:13 pm
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    In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first nation to effectively check and remove the Ebola threat that was ravaging three other countries in the West African region, as its exceptional approach to contact tracing became an effective strategy later used by other nations, such as the Usa, when Ebola dangers were discovered.

  • May 6, 2016 at 9:20 pm
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    On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a loose federation of self-governing states, the independent state faced the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  • May 6, 2016 at 9:27 pm
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    Modern day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from Britis